“Meritorious Vacuum” • Ron DeSantis for President in 2024

By: Eric

Vacuum Concept in Physics

In school, physics class, we completed exercises and it was commonly noted these laws of physics exist “in a vacuum“.

An example; an object that falls through a vacuum is subjected to only one external force, gravity, so be it a cotton ball or marble, the free fall is only determined by gravitational force. Both objects will have equal acceleration – 9.8 meters per square second – in the vacuum.

Outside the vacuum, weight, size, shape, friction, elevation levels, mass/density, etc – of course will affect the rate of acceleration in free fall of the cotton ball vs the marble.

Politics Does Not Take Place in a Vacuum

American leadership is plagued, beyond redemption, by outside factors: elections, policy enactment, partisanship, “special interests”, ideological frameworks, current events, social issues, media pressure, economic conditions, geopolitical matters, disinformation, misinformation, bias, hyperbole, rumors, speculation, lies, ugly truths – there is no vacuum.

Alot of us have been left with the notion political theatre is indeed “fake and gay” – some of us feel the two-party system is a smoke screen for that both parties at the end of the day work in concert with one another. The Establishment, it is indeed. This malfeasance that is our reality gets depressing so I will utilize the vacuum concept to state my case for why Ronald DeSantis is a meritoriously fit candidate for president.

In this hypothetical vacuum, meritocracy is the one force.

Real Commander in Chief: Military Service Required

The President serves as Commander in Chief of the Armed Forces. The boss. The boss must have the experience when it comes to the nature of the work at hand of his subordinates. This goes for any profession. A real boss knows how to run that shit for he did it himself. Think of the expanse of the military population – they take a fellow comrade seriously and deem them on the same page versus a civilian that has zero military experience. We can pose this question to soldiers. I am confident they would agree. It has been said there is an irrevocable sense of respect, dignity, honor, loyalty that soldiers have for one another. Again, this may occur in a vacuum. Military authority must be delegated by a supreme commander who is a military man.

DeSantis served in the US Navy and this began in 2004. He earned the rank of Lieutenant Commander. He fulfilled various duties within his service with the Navy. He was deployed to Iraq in 2007. There are accolades he earned that I am not qualified to expand upon, regardless, he is an accomplished military man. He is a soldier. He is initiated.

Lt. Commander DeSantis, in this vacuum, is meritoriously qualified.

Next:

Mechanics of Law: Executive Orders & Veto Power – Juris Doctorate & Bar Certification Required (Attorney)

Amongst other executive functions, the President has two – again, in a vacuum – carte blanche powers.

One of these is the capacity to enact Executive Orders. Executive orders are issued by the President of the United States, acting in his capacity as head of the executive branch, directing a federal official or administrative agency to engage in a course of action or refrain from a course of action. They are enforceable to the extent that the represent a valid exercise of the President’s power (i.e. the action must be within the president’s constitutional authority).

The other is Veto Power. The President of the United States of America has the power of the veto, which means he can stop legislation from becoming law. The president’s veto power is just one of the many separations of power, or “checks and balances” of the United States government. The legislative, judicial, and executive branches make up our government’s separation of power.Both the House of Representatives and Senate (collectively known as Congress) vote on bills to become law. When the House of Representatives proposes and then passes a bill, it continues on to the Senate. If the Senate also passes the bill, then the bill continues on to the president, who either signs it into law, or does not sign and vetoes the bill.

Governor DeSantis earned his Juris Doctorate and was also accepted to the bar as a practicing attorney. The reason why this merit is essential is that executive orders, veto power – the application of these functions – remember in a vacuum – it is absolutely essential that the person with this magnitude of decision making authority understands the language of the law. This is what the entire government, three branches of government is all about – under the Constitution:

  • Legislative—Makes laws (Congress, comprised of the House of Representatives and Senate)
  • Executive—Carries out laws (president, vice president, Cabinet, most federal agencies)
  • Judicial—Evaluates laws (Supreme Court and other courts)

The keyword here is LAW. I hold the belief that in order to craft, propose, assess, examine, evaluate, author, interpret, pass, veto the law – the individual must be equipped with the education with which laws are written (for the notion of enacting policy is literally activating legislation – bringing something into law). Beyond the education, which occurs in a two-dimensional setting in essence (books, exams, writing papers, etc) – practical experience as a bar certified attorney is necessary. This is the same notion that a person aspiring to be a rocket scientist must first pass core science classes (physics, organic chemistry,etc) before they are launching rockets thru the stratosphere.

Ronald DeSantis, Esquire, in this vacuum, has satisfied the called for basis of merit.

Next:

Real World Governmental Experience: Prior Posts as a Statesman

The President is the chief of the military and has certain authorities to take actions immune to governmental dissent , in a vacuum remember.

The federal government has alot, an awful lot of moving parts. There are the three branches, Legislative, Executive and Judicial. The innards of each branch are complex. We have the Cabinet, committees, agencies – pretty massive.

In summary, Ron DeSantis is a former Congressman. In 2012 he was elected as a member of the House of Representatives from Florida. Within this realm, he gained first hand exposure to the legislative process – to the mechanics of passing law. At the federal level. It goes without saying that this experience calls for partisanship; loyalty to party will consequentially collide with “what is best for everyone” – but that is the very divisive aspect of “rules based international order of democracy” of which my disdain will be saved for later blog entries. Right now I am focusing on the vacuum.

Ronald DeSantis worked in the House of Representatives, he was on various congressional committees, he did the work.

Ultimately, this paved a path to his gubernatorial candidacy and inevitable election to Governor of Florida. It is here in his role as governor, he is enacting masterful policy. Yes, this is my opinion. He is able to do so for no one can call into question his meritorious statecraft.

This nation has huge fucking problems. Bleeding resources into the bankers wars. ZOG. Radical black blocs (not real anarchists) bringing ruin to small businesses. Quantitative easing. Conservatives drawn to the Qanon psyop which directs their angst into the “satanic baby eating cabal” which conveniently redirects them from any semblance of their own racial awakening. Malicious vaccines being pushed for the batflu – with a $25 CVS gift card as incentive. Fuel costs are out of control and the (((speculators))) benefit. We are on the verge of the real World War Three. The Deep Fakes are coming. Politicians are rotten.

Yeah, it’s political theatre. Yes. However I believe in the power of a vacuum. It can come and clean alot of shit up real quick. DeSantis could be the man we need.

Or…vacuum or not, he might still suck

Last Defendant Sentenced in Gangster Disciples Case • Department of Justice

Source: https://www.justice.gov/opa/pr/last-defendant-sentenced-gangster-disciples-case

Lewis Mobley, 45, of Atlanta, Georgia, was sentenced Tuesday to 40 years in prison for his role as an enforcer for the Gangster Disciples gang, including shooting a minor in the chest twice for interrupting the filming of a gang rap video.

“These sentences are a major achievement in our fight against gang violence,” said Assistant Attorney General Kenneth A. Polite Jr. for the Justice Department’s Criminal Division. “The Gangster Disciples have ravaged communities across the nation, but now dozens of their leaders and enforcers are off the streets thanks to the extraordinary devotion of our federal, state and local law enforcement partners.”

“For decades, the Gangster Disciples have destroyed communities all across the United States,” said Acting U.S. Attorney Kurt R. Erskine for the Northern District of Georgia. “The gang’s criminal activity in Atlanta included the killing of innocent people, brazen shootings, and prolific drug-trafficking. These horrific acts and the victims lost and injured will not soon be forgotten. Our community remains united and our law enforcement partners are committed to making sure this type of crippling criminal activity is met with our best investigative and prosecutorial effort. We understand that the sentences issued in this case will not mend the hearts of those who lost loved ones to the crimes of the Gangster Disciples, but we do believe they will make our community safer.”

“The Gangster Disciples have wreaked havoc in our neighborhoods for far too long with the drug trafficking, thefts, violent assaults and murders they have committed,” said Special Agent in Charge Chris Hacker of FBI’s Atlanta Field Office. “Mobley is the last of many members of the ruthless gang to be sentenced as a part of this investigation by the FBI’s Safe Streets Gang Task Force and its state and local partners. We are all committed to dismantling these organized and violent criminal enterprises in order to make Atlanta and all of our communities safer for our citizens.”

“These gang members committed a number of heinous crimes including murder, and this sentence ensures the final defendant was held accountable for his actions,” said Assistant Director Calvin Shivers of the FBI’s Criminal Investigative Division. “This verdict shows the FBI is firmly committed to putting violent offenders behind bars and dismantling criminal enterprises across the country in order to make our communities safe from violent street gangs.”

In total, 38 defendants have been sentenced in the case, which a federal grand jury indicted on April 27, 2016, and then superseded to add defendants on Oct. 24, 2018. Convicted defendants include the highest ranks of Gangster Disciples leaders from Alabama, Colorado, Georgia, Kansas, Illinois, Michigan, Wisconsin and California.

The Gangster Disciples are a national gang with roots in Chicago, Illinois, dating back to the 1970s, and are now active in at least 25 states. The Gangster Disciples brought money into the gang through, among other things, drug trafficking, robbery, carjacking, extortion, wire fraud, credit card fraud, insurance fraud and bank fraud. The gang protected its power and operation through threats, intimidation and violence, including murder, attempted murder, assault and obstruction of justice. It also promoted the Gangster Disciples enterprise through member-only activities, including conference calls, celebrations of the birthday of the Gangster Disciples founder, the annual Gangster Ball, award ceremonies and other events.

The gang was highly structured, with a hierarchy of leadership posts known as “Positions of Authority” or “POAs.” Members were organized into different positions, including board members and governor-of-governors who each controlled geographic regions; governors, assistant governors, chief enforcers and chief of security for each state where Gangster Disciples were active; and coordinators and leaders within each local group.

The gang strictly enforces rules for its members, the most important of which was “silence and secrecy” – a prohibition on cooperating with law enforcement. To enforce discipline among Gangster Disciples and adherence to the strict rules and structure, members and associates were routinely fined, beaten and even murdered, for failing to follow rules.

At trial, the government presented evidence that the Gangster Disciples were responsible for 25 shootings from 2011 through 2015, including eight murders, multiple robberies, the extortion of rap artists to force the artists to become affiliated with the Gangster Disciples, fraud losses of over $450,000, and the trafficking of large amounts of heroin, cocaine, methamphetamine, illegal prescription drugs and marijuana. Additionally, through trial and pleas, a total of 33 different firearms were forfeited.

Those sentenced by the court include:

  • Donald Glass, 31, of Decatur, Georgia, the leader of HATE Committee, a Gangster Disciples “enforcement team,” was sentenced to life plus 10 years in prison after a trial jury found him guilty of RICO conspiracy and using a firearm to cause death.
  • Lewis Mobley, 45, of Atlanta, Georgia, a Gangster Disciple enforcer, was sentenced to 40 years in prison after a trail jury found him guilty of RICO conspiracy, attempted murder in aid of racketeering, and using a firearm during that attempted murder.
  • Shauntay Craig, 43, of Birmingham, Alabama, who held the rank of Gangster Disciples Board Member, was sentenced to 40 years in prison after pleading guilty to RICO conspiracy.
  • Kevin Clayton, 48, of Decatur, Georgia, the chief enforcer of the Gangster Disciples in Georgia, was sentenced to 33 years in prison after a trial jury convicted him of RICO conspiracy.
  • Alonzo Walton, 52, of Atlanta, Georgia, who held different positions including overseeing the gang in Georgia, Florida, Texas, Indiana and South Carolina, was sentenced to 32 years in prison after a trial jury found him guilty of RICO conspiracy, carjacking and using a firearm in connection of that carjacking.
  • Vertuies Wall, 45, of Marietta, Georgia, the leader of the Macon branch of the Gangster Disciples, was sentenced to 30 years in prison after a trial jury found him guilty of RICO conspiracy.
  • Antarious Caldwell, 28, of Atlanta, Georgia, a Gangster Disciples HATE Committee member, was sentenced to 30 years in prison after a trial jury found him guilty of RICO conspiracy, robbery, and using a firearm in connection with that robbery.
  • Mario Jackson, 39, of Jacksonville, Florida, the gang “governor” of Florida, was sentenced to 22 years in prison after pleading guilty to RICO conspiracy.
  • Lawrence Grice, 32, of Bay City, Texas, the gang “overseer” for Texas, was sentenced to 21 years and 10 months in custody, after a trial jury found him guilty of RICO conspiracy and illegal drug distribution.
  • Mangwiro Sadiki-Yisrael, 48, of Marietta, Georgia, who held different positions including gang “governor” of Georgia, was sentenced to 20 years in prison and ordered to pay $396,942.46 in restitution to victims based on his fraud conduct, after pleading guilty to RICO conspiracy.
  • Damien Madison, 34, of Denver, Colorado, the gang “governor” of Colorado, was sentenced to 19 years and seven months, after pleading guilty to RICO conspiracy.
  • Vancito Gumbs, 29, of Stone Mountain, Georgia, a member of the Gangster Disciples while at the same time serving as a police officer with the DeKalb County, Georgia Police Department, who provided sensitive information to the Gangster Disciples and claimed to be a hitman for them, was sentenced to 15 years in prison after a trial jury found him guilty of RICO conspiracy.
  • Frederick Johnson, 44, of Marietta, Georgia, a Gangster Disciples member who sold drugs with other gang members, was sentenced to 12 years in prison after pleading guilty to RICO conspiracy.
  • Antonio Ahmad, 39, of Atlanta, Georgia, the chief of security for senior gang leaders in Georgia, was sentenced to 15 years in prison after pleading guilty to RICO conspiracy.
  • Roy Farrell, deceased, of Hattiesburg, Mississippi, a former Gangster Disciples board member, was sentenced to 12 years and six months in prison after pleading guilty RICO conspiracy.
  • Jeremiah Covington, 38, of Valdosta, Georgia, a local leader for the Valdosta region Gangster Disciples, was sentenced to 11 years and three months in prison after pleading guilty to RICO conspiracy.
  • Dereck Taylor, 35, who provided security to Macon, Georgia gang leadership, was sentenced to 10 years in prison after pleading guilty to RICO conspiracy.
  • James Travis Riley, 40, of Coffeyville, Kansas, the gang “governor” of Kansas, was sentenced to 10 years in prison after pleading guilty to conspiring to distribute illegal drugs.
  • Nicholas Evans, 32, of Newport Beach, California, was sentenced to 10 years in prison after pleading guilty to conspiring to distribute illegal drugs.
  • Ronald McMorris, 39, of Atlanta, Georgia, a local leader of the Atlanta Gangster Disciples, was sentenced to nine years in prison and ordered to pay $10,345 in restitution to victims after pleading guilty to RICO conspiracy.
  • Markell White, 48, of Atlanta, Georgia, a regional leader in Macon, Georgia, was sentenced to eight years and nine months in prison after pleading guilty to RICO conspiracy.
  • Eric Manney, 38, of Atlanta, Georgia, a Gangster Disciples’ member who stored narcotics and multiple guns at his house, was sentenced to eight years and one month in prison after pleading guilty to RICO conspiracy.
  • Terrance Summers, 48, of Birmingham, Alabama, the gang governor for Alabama, was sentenced to eight years in prison after pleading guilty to RICO conspiracy.
  • Alvis O’Neal, 43, of Denver, Colorado, a drug trafficker for the Gangster Disciples, was sentenced to seven years and six months in custody after pleading guilty to RICO conspiracy.
  • Condelay Abbitt, 37, of Hoover, Alabama, a Gangster Disciples member who transported illegal drugs for the gang, was sentenced to seven years and three months in prison after pleading guilty to RICO conspiracy.
  • Adrian Jackson, 42, of San Jose, California, the national treasurer for the Gangster Disciples, was sentenced to seven years in prison after pleading guilty to RICO conspiracy.
  • Charles Wingate, 31, of Conyers, Georgia, a local leader for the Gangster Disciples in Covington, Georgia who sold drugs with the gang, was sentenced to six years and nine months in prison after pleading guilty to RICO conspiracy.
  • Quiana Franklin, 38, of Birmingham, Alabama, a Gangster Disciples’ member who stored drugs for gang leader Shauntay Craig, was sentenced to four years and nine months in prison after pleading guilty to RICO conspiracy.
  • Anthony Blaine, 39, of Dallas, Georgia, a Gangster Disciples member who engaged in fraud for the gang, was sentenced to three years and five months in prison and ordered to pay $64,234.29 in restitution to victims, after pleading guilty to RICO conspiracy.
  • Myrick Stevens, 32, of Madison, Wisconsin, a Gangster Disciples member who engaged in fraud for the gang, was sentenced to three years and five months in prison and ordered to pay $8,700 in restitution to victims after pleading guilty to RICO conspiracy.
  • Thomas Pasby, 47, of Cochran, Georgia, a Gangster Disciples member who engaged in fraud for the gang, was sentenced to two years and six months in prison and ordered to pay $83,918.56 in restitution to victims after pleading guilty to RICO conspiracy.
  • Laderris Dickerson, 51, of Hartselle, Alabama, who orchestrated a carjacking with senior Gangster Disciples members, was sentenced to two years and six months in prison after pleading guilty to federal carjacking.
  • Carlton King Jr., 31, of Cochran, Georgia, a Gangster Disciples member who engaged in fraud for the gang, was sentenced to two years in prison and ordered to pay $5,897.88 in restitution to victims, after pleading guilty to RICO conspiracy.
  • Michael Drummond, 54, of Marietta, Georgia, a Gangster Disciples member who engaged in fraud for the gang, was sentenced to two years in prison and ordered to pay $3,677 in restitution to victims, after pleading guilty to RICO conspiracy.
  • Curtis Thomas, 44, of Cochran, Georgia, a Gangster Disciples member who engaged in fraud for the gang, was sentenced to one year and nine months in prison and ordered to pay $59,521.90 in restitution to victims, after pleading guilty to RICO conspiracy.
  • Kelvin Sneed, 33, of Cochran, Georgia, a Gangster Disciples member who engaged in fraud for the gang, was sentenced to one year and six months in prison and ordered to pay $24,417.89 in restitution to victims, after pleading guilty to RICO conspiracy.
  • Arrie Freeney, 37, of Detroit, Michigan, a Gangster Disciples member who engaged in fraud for the gang, was sentenced to one year and a day in prison and ordered to pay $25,641.36 in restitution to victims, after pleading guilty to RICO conspiracy.
  • Denise Carter, 47, of Detroit, Michigan, a Gangster Disciples member who engaged in fraud for the gang, was sentenced to eight months of home confinement and three years of probation and ordered to pay $7,938.45 in restitution to victims, after pleading guilty to RICO conspiracy.

The FBI, U.S. Marshals Service, the Bureau of Alcohol, Tobacco, Firearms, and Explosives (ATF), U.S. Postal Inspection Services, IRS-Criminal Investigation, the Federal Bureau of Prisons, Atlanta Police Department, Fulton County Sheriff’s Office, Clayton County Police Department, DeKalb County District Attorney’s Office, DeKalb Police Department, Georgia Dept. of Community Supervision, Georgia Department of Corrections, Gwinnett County Police Department, and Marietta Police Department investigated the case.

Principal Deputy Chief Kim S. Dammers and Trial Attorneys Conor Mulroe and Hans Miller of the Criminal Division’s Organized Crime and Gang Section and Assistant U.S. Attorneys Ryan Buchanan, Erin Spritzer, and Stephanie Gabay-Smith of the Northern District of Georgia prosecuted the case.